Internal PR for Employee Retention & Productivity By M E Kennedy, Founder and President of eReleases Reviewed by Momizat on . In public relations we’re trained to deal directly with (obviously) the public. However, it’s sometimes easy to forget that “the public” includes our own co-wor In public relations we’re trained to deal directly with (obviously) the public. However, it’s sometimes easy to forget that “the public” includes our own co-wor Rating: 0
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Internal PR for Employee Retention & Productivity By M E Kennedy, Founder and President of eReleases

In public relations we’re trained to deal directly with (obviously) the public. However, it’s sometimes easy to forget that “the public” includes our own co-workers! They are another part of the job and sometimes need motivation and encouragement. What are some ways you can use your PR skills to keep employees happy and motivated?

Internal Tweets

I tried to get this set up at an old job to no avail. Of course, that was before Twitter was a household name. Now, you’re not a real celebrity or business unless you have your own Twitter account. So use it!

Establish a business community of uniform Twitter accounts. If your company name is Lampshades Incorporated, then perhaps each account can start or end with LI or LampInc. Make sure they’re set to private and have everyone follow each other.

Now, your entire company has an instant community set up to discuss business and become closer. The public nature of the feed ensures it’s kept (mostly) to business discussions, and any employee who’s swamped with work can request help and the entire company can pitch in.

employee retention

Direct Communication

“Real talk.” It’s all the rage with the kids these days, as they say. Real talk is when you speak the truth and nothing but. Real talk would include telling your employees how times are going to be tough but you have a plan. Spare them the platitudes and quotes from Churchill.

At one company, the boss learned our company was going to close our office and outsource an entire department’s jobs to India. The company told her to keep it a secret because they were planning on making it official about a month before they shut down. Basically, they didn’t want employees jumping ship during a transition.

Sensing how wrong it was to allow employees to buy cars and houses while she knew vital information that would affect their futures, she told her department shortly after she found out. Nobody bailed on her before the shutdown. The boss respected her employees enough to let them know the truth. That’s real talk.

Surveys

Once in a while, people just need to complain and get crap off their chest. It happens to the best of us. Occasionally, said miserable employees could have a very real, fixable problem. Letting your employees know you care what they think might even boost morale to begin with!

At one of my old jobs back in the day, our boss asked us directly what things in the office we might change (quick note: try anonymous surveys, as this was awkward). Somebody came up with the great idea that watching movies in the office would increase productivity. Did it? Not really. But it sure made us feel like we were being heard and contributing.

Have you ever had to deal with internal PR? Do you feel like enough companies make this a priority?

About The Author

By Mickie Kennedy, founder of eReleases, the online leader in affordable PR distribution since 1998. Grab your free copy of Ultimate Guide to Pinterest here, a must-read for the small business professional. Follow eReleases on Google+, Pinterest, Facebook and Twitter.

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